Tashkent


Tashkent

General Info.

From ancient times, Tashkent was known as “Chach”. Later, the province came to be known as Chachkand, meaning ‘Chach City’. However, in the mid-7th century under the Samanid Dynasty, it adopted the name Binkath. The Arabs however, retained the old name but pronounced it as ‘Al-Shash’. Eventually, after a string of name changes, the name Tashkent was used because it had more meaning to the new inhabitants as it meant ‘Stone City’ when translated literally.


Tashkent, central capital of Uzbekistan has been playing an important role in Central Asia and has been the leading center of the Great Silk Road linking east to west, north to south. The city used to be famous in the east and west for its scientists, architects and poets.


Archaeologists identified some significant archaeological objects in the territory of Tashkent which are different compared to other regions as they are more commercial oriented. Among them are - the Kulkeldash Madrassah, the Barak-Khan Madrassah complex, the Kaffal Shashi Mausoleums, and the Yunus-Khan Mausoleum. The view of Kulkeldash Madrassah demonstrates one of the very prominent features of modern Tashkent with its amazing many-sided feature.


However, Tashkent was changed forever in April 1966 when a massive earthquake hits vast areas of the town and left 30,000 people homeless.


Since 1991, drastic changes occurred economically, culturally, and architecturally in Tashkent. The largest statue ever erected for Lenin was replaced with a globe at the Amir Timur Complex complete with a geographical map of Uzbekistan. Buildings from the Soviet era have been replaced with new, modern buildings. One example is the "Downtown Tashkent" district which includes the 22-storey NBU Bank building, the Intercontinental Hotel, the International Business Center, and the Plaza Building.


Despite their eccentric history, Tashkent today is the attractive and vibrant capital of Uzbekistan with super modern constructions and skyscrapers.